Sign the Petition Supporting a Work Balance Tax Credit: 
https://www.change.org/p/president-of-the-united-states-we-support-a-work-balance-tax-credit
dddlkdjlddd;lkd;kAccording to 2016 Department of Labor -  Labor Force Statistics from the Current Population Survey (In thousands)  - Woman in the 22-54 years range total 36,959, but only 3,049 work less than 35 hours for economic and non-economic (child rearing) reasons.   This represents roughly 12% of the work force allowed to work part-time.  https://www.bls.gov/cps/cpsaat08.htm

Clearly, not many employers are convinced that part-time and/or flexible work schedules are a valuable asset for both the Employer and Employees.

Our goal is to be a disrupter, and to shift the paradigm to make caring for children and family a priority and value added to not only Employer’s, but to society as a whole.   Simply put, raising health and happy children insures the next generation will prosper and be valued and give value back to making our country and planet better - healthier - driven by purpose and not just money or status and job titles.  It may be hard to fathom - but inherently I think we all know - deep down - success is a state of mind one achieves through living a life with purpose, not the balance in your bank account.    

Many recent best selling books like “Lean In” glorify working full time and full throttle as being successful and feed into the paradigm that Woman can and should do it all - that is keep working full-time while also raising children.  

Not many people have the luxury or choice to reduce their paychecks and working hours to care for their children, however, we hope that Employers will see the value in giving men and woman this option. 

Many websites and articles are devoted to helping those who want to make a case for a career and family balance. The following excerpts offer excellent advice for anyone wanting to make a case for part time or a flexible work schedule. 

A 2017 article published in on flexjobs.com provides: 

“If you’re like the majority of workers, the office is not the place where you do your most productive work. According to FlexJobs’ sixth annual survey of more than 5,500 respondents, 66% of professionals think they would be more productive working remotely than in a traditional office. And there’s much more to learn from the survey results!

To help the many people seeking remote work options, FlexJobs has identified the 25 companies that have posted the most remote job openings recently. Scroll down for the complete results of our Super Survey and the list of companies, with examples of currently available remote jobs.

FlexJobs also published a breakdown of data from working parents (those with children 18 or younger at home) who took the 6th Annual Work Flex Super Survey. Check it out here: “Working Parents in 2017: What They Want at Work.”

Full Results from FlexJobs’ 6th Annual Super Survey

Who Wants Flexible Work Options

We often assume that flexible work appeals to a wide variety of professionals for different reasons, but this survey really shows how true that is.

Survey respondents identified themselves as:

Working parents (35%)
Freelancers (26%)
Introverts (23%)
Entrepreneurs (21%)
People living in rural areas (15%)
Stay-at-home moms (14%)
People with chronic physical or mental illness (14%)
Digital nomads (12%)
Caregivers (9%)
Students (9%)
Retirees (8%)
Super commuters (8%)
Environmentalists (6%)
Military spouses (2%)
Stay-at-home dads (2%)
Most survey respondents were baby boomers and gen X, but all generations were represented to varying degrees:

Gen Z (1%)
Millennial or gen Y (21%)
Gen X (41%)
Baby boomer (31%)
Silent generation (6%)
Why Professionals Seek Flexible Work Options

Each year, we ask people to choose the factors that make them want a job with a flexible work option. Since 2013, work-life balance (78%), family (49%), time savings (46%), and commute stress (45%) have been the top four reported reasons people seek flexible work.

In fact, time savings and commute stress may be related: 71% said they have had round-trip commutes of over an hour. Other highly ranked factors include avoiding office politics and distractions (39%) and travel (30%).

People interested in work flexibility evaluate job prospects with that in mind. Respondents said the “most important factors” considered when they evaluate a job prospect are:

Work-life balance (72%)
Flexible schedule and salary (tie) (69%)
Telecommuting (60%)
Meaningful work (57%)
Work schedule (48%)
Location (45%)
Company reputation (40%)
Health insurance (37%)
Professional challenge (36%)
Company culture (34%)
Career progression (30%)
401(k)/retirement benefits and vacation time (tie) (29%)
Skills training and education options (28%)
Amount of travel required (25%)
How a Lack of Flexibility Affects People’s Job Choices, Health

Of survey respondents, 62% have left or considered leaving a job because it did not have work flexibility:

Yes, I have left a job. (32%)
Yes, I am currently looking for a new job. (16%)
Yes, I have considered leaving a job. (14%)
And this makes sense when looking at how respondents said having a flexible job would affect their health and quality of life.

Quality of life: 45% said a job with flexibility would have a huge improvement on their overall quality of life and 52% said it would have a positive impact.
Health: 78% of people said having a flexible job would allow them to be healthier (eat better, exercise more, etc.) and 86% said they’d be less stressed.
Most Desired Types of Flexible Work

Telecommuting remains the most popular form of flexible work, and those who’ve already worked remotely are increasing the amount of time they spend working from home. Of those who telecommuted in 2016, 23% telecommuted more this year than last year.

When asked to choose which types of flexibility they’re most interested, survey respondents said:

Telecommuting 100% of the time (81%)
Flexible schedule (70%)
Telecommuting some of the time (46%)
Part-time schedule (46%)
Alternative schedule (44%)
Freelance contract (39%)
How Remote Work Helps Productivity

Asked whether they would be more productive working remotely or in a traditional office space, respondents said:

More productive in a home office (66%)
Probably about the same productivity (32%)
Less productive in a home office (2%)
That’s understandable when you consider their answers to this question:

“Where do you go when you really need to get something done for work?”

My home or my home office (52%)
The office during regular office hours, because it’s not an option to leave (25%)
The office during regular office hours, because it’s where I’m most productive (7%)
The office before/after regular office hours (8%)
A library, coffee shop, or coworking space (6%)
The top reasons respondents said they would be, or are, more productive working remotely are:

Fewer interruptions from colleagues (76%)
Fewer distractions (76%)
Reduced stress from commuting (70%)
Minimal office politics (69%)
Quieter noise level (62%)
More comfortable clothes (54%)
More personalized office environment (51%)
Less frequent meetings (46%)
More efficient meetings (31%)
Why People Work

We wanted to learn about why people work—their needs and motivations.

We found that the majority of people have mixed reasons for working:

I both need and want to work. (64%)
I need to work. (25%)
I want to work. (11%)
The specific reasons respondents said they work:

Pay for basic necessities (rent or mortgage, groceries, utilities, etc.) (76%)
Save for retirement (61%)
Want to travel (56%)
Pay off debt (54%)
Enjoy working (54%)
Pay for “luxury” items for yourself or your loved ones (meaning not basic necessities) (43%)
Passionate about success in my career (39%)
Want to have a professional impact in the world (38%)
Pay for health-related issues for myself or a loved one (37%)
Contribute to charity (27%)
Pay for other child-related costs (child care, extracurriculars, etc.) (25%)
Save for my kids’ education (25%)
Pay for my kids’ education (private school or college) (24%)
Pay for continuing education for myself (23%)
Support my parents (15%)
What This Means for Employers

Flexible work options are often seen as a perk for the workers only, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. Employers benefit greatly from offering flexible work options in these ways according to survey respondents:

Employee retention: 79% of respondents said they would be more loyal to their employers if they had flexible work options.
Working relationships: 73% think remote work is conducive to having strong work relationships.
Reducing expenses: 29% of respondents said they would take a 10% or 20% cut in pay. 22% are willing to forfeit vacation time. 19% said they would give up employer-matching retirement contributions.
Education and experience: Work flexibility appeals to highly educated and experienced workers. 79% of respondents have at least a college degree and 31% are senior manager level or higher.
Hiring strategy: 97% of respondents are interested in being a flexible worker in the long-term. Offering flexible work options can help attract well-educated professionals with solid experience who come from diverse backgrounds.
Demographic Breakdown of the 5,551 Respondents

Age: 20-29 (11%), 30-49 (50%), 50-59 (26%), 60+ (13%)
Education: high school degree or equivalent (5%), some college but no degree (16%), associate or bachelor’s degree (49%), graduate degree (30%)
Career level: entry-level (11%), experienced (58%), manager or senior level manager (31%)
The Top 25 Companies Recently Hiring for Remote Jobs

To help job seekers interested in finding jobs where they can work from home, FlexJobs has identified the top 25 companies recently hiring for remote jobs. This list is based on an analysis of over 40,000 companies and looks specifically at their remote job posting histories in FlexJobs’ database between May 1 and July 31, 2017.

The jobs offered by these companies had to be remote work-friendly, either allowing for candidates to work remotely entirely or part of the time. Current remote job openings that pay six figures at several these companies include medical director, senior cloud architect, and clinical advisor pharmacist. Other high-paying job listings include senior data programmer, director – service and support, and speech language pathologist.
Kaplan
UnitedHealth Group
K12
VocoVision
Connections Education
Leidos
CyraCom
Vivint Smart Home
Thermo Fisher Scientific
SYKES
CSRA
Allergan
PRA Health Sciences
Anthem, Inc.
Conduent
Cornerstone OnDemand
Salesforce
Humana
Dell
Xerox
Appen
Haynes & Company
SAP
Wells Fargo
Teradata

https://www.flexjobs.com/blog/post/productive-working-remotely-top-companies-hiring/

A Forbes article in 2016 also offers some good advice for those who are at the proverbial cross roads of raising children and having a career.  It provides: 

“Traditional working hours are changing. Not only is it becoming more common for employers to offer flexible work schedules, but many are discovering the benefits, both financially and in terms of productivity, of having a part-time or flexible workforce.

Though it doesn't work for every company or boss, if you find yourself in a position where it's that or quit, it's worth bringing up — especially if you can show you're capable of taking care of your responsibilities in less time. Below, seven coaches from Forbes Coaches Council tell you how to strategize before broaching the subject with your employer. 

1. Offer a Solution to a Problem

Employers love problem solvers. Schedule some time to meet with your employer to figure out what their biggest challenge is and come up with a game plan to solve it. Map out everything that you've accomplished during your tenure as a part-time employee and list out what you bring to the table specifically. Have a follow-up conversation explaining your value and how you can be an asset to the company. — Ariel Lopez, 2020Shift


2. Show You Are the Right Person for the Job

You can demonstrate your value to a prospective employer through your willingness to get the job done and showing that you are the right person for the job. While the position may be full time, perhaps your enthusiasm, focused time management, and stellar interpersonal skills allow you to do full-time work in more efficient time-saving ways. Be the solution the employer needs and you will win. — Wendi Weiner, JD, NCRW, CPRW, CCM, The Writing Guru

3. Show a Full-Time Value Despite Your Part-Time Schedule

As an organizational psychologist and as a coach for job searchers, what I advise job seekers who are under this circumstance is to do everything at 100 percent, as if they want to work full time. In other words, show your skills as if you could offer the company a full-time value despite your part-time schedule. Showing how the company would save money for a reduced labor cost would also work. — Dr. Cherry Collier, Personality Matters, INC.

4. Reframe the Opportunity as a Win-Win for Both of You

Instead of leading with the "why you can't," bring the "why you can" to the table. Showcasing a plan that allows you to work smarter versus harder is a win for the employer. Especially if you can fill a need that keeps productivity up and saves them on other costs related to labor. Show your ingenuity and innovation to reframe the opportunity as a win-win for both of you. — Jen Kelchner, Kelchner Advisory

5. Prove You're Invaluable and Efficient

Few positions these days actually require full-time hours, especially when someone is focused and efficient in their work. If you're looking at a position that's full time but can only give part time hours show the hiring manager that you're more efficient than anyone else they can hire. They'll get results faster, making you an invaluable part of the team. — Kelly Azevedo, She's Got Systems

6. Focus on Results

What does the employer want? If it's a results-based position, demonstrate how you can deliver the outcome the employer is looking for while reducing their labor costs. They get the production they're seeking from the position with less of an investment. — Pat Rigsby, PatRigsby.com

7. Present a Solid Plan

Identify your average weekly availability to work (including "normal" work hours and availability during weeknights/weekends). With some flexibility on hours and good time management, you can work closer to full-time hours while still maximizing time for the rest of your life (family, school, etc.). Be prepared with a plan to show how your background and flexibility is a recipe for success. — Emily Kapit, MS, MRW, ACRW, CPRW, ReFresh Your Step, LLC”

See https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbescoachescouncil/2016/03/18/how-to-convince-your-employer-to-let-you-work-part-time/#20cc944f2e88

Another Forbes article states: why many employer’s may not grant your request: TRUST.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/lizryan/2017/03/15/the-real-reason-youre-not-allowed-to-work-from-home/#2e92f6217084


US News and World Report also gave some good advice in 2012 as outlined below:

“1. First, assess your reason. We'd all love to work less and make more, but consider what your real reasons are for wanting to work part-time. Do you want to spend more time with your family? Are you finding your current workload overwhelming? Maybe you're going back to school and need extra time for class and homework. Or are you starting a business you want to focus on? Understanding your motivation for moving into part-time work can help you better convince your boss that he should consider it. And knowing whether going part-time would be temporary or permanent will also help him decide.

2. Next, know your data. While your boss might use the information you show him to make his decision, it will help you make your point that part-time jobs are on the rise. Approximately 25 percent of all working women in the United States work part-time, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Find data that backs up your points, and if possible, find someone who successfully works part-time in your company to interview.

Studies also show that workers who are in the office half of the time can be as productive, if not more so, than their full-time counterparts, possibly because they have less time to get more done, and don't waste time at the water cooler.

3. Outline what part-time would look like. Part-time jobs can be 20 hours a week, or 30. They can be half day, five days a week, or two days in the office at full throttle. They can be worked in the office or at home. Devise a plan for your ideal situation, and then another that you'd be satisfied with, should your boss not bite on the ideal plan.

Consider the work you won't be able to get done. You could propose hiring another part-timer for the other half of your workload, or advocate to distribute the work amongst your co-workers (an idea they won't be excited about).

4. Prepare your pitch. Your boss will want reassurance that you'll be as productive and accessible as you've been in the past. Have answers ready about your availability: You'll be available via chat or phone during specific hours, and you'll respond to emails within 24 hours. Find the balance that will make him feel like he's winning in cutting your salary but still getting the benefit of being able to access you, while you get the benefit of working less.

Schedule a time to discuss your part-time proposal; don't accost your boss in the hallway in between meetings. You need his or her undivided attention, and you need to be able to pitch your idea professionally. Keep your emotions and personal woes out of it. Focus on how working part-time will help both you and the company.

If your company is hesitant about signing off on the idea, propose a trial period of three months. If they agree to this, do your best to show them how well the scenario can work.”

https://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/outside-voices-careers/2012/11/12/how-to-switch-to-part-time-work Writen by: Lindsay Olson.

It the pros and cons don’t convince an Employer, it may be necessary to appeal to their bottom line.  Legislation at the local, state and federal levels may also help persuade Employers to offer options.  Government sweeteners and tax credits for those who offer flexible work schedules and part-time options may help provide the proverbial carrot to get Employers to offer options to mothers and fathers who want to help care for their children and family.   

To achieve effective legislative remedies, we must examine successful programs implemented by other countries and enlist the help of influencers on both sides of the political aisle such as Ivanka Trump and Senator Gillibrand and other respected political activist groups and leaders who forge a bipartisan win-win solution for the next generation and generations tomhh come. 

According to 2016 Department of Labor -  Labor Force Statistics from the Current Population Survey (In thousands)  - Woman in the 22-54 years range total 36,959, but only 3,049 work less than 35 hours for economic and non-economic (child rearing) reasons.   This represents roughly 12% of the work force allowed to work part-time.  https://www.bls.gov/cps/cpsaat08.htm


Clearly, not many employers are convinced that part-time and/or flexible work schedules are a valuable asset for both the Employer and Employees.


Our goal is to be a disrupter, and to shift the paradigm to make caring for children and family a priority and value added to not only Employer’s, but to society as a whole.   Simply put, raising health and happy children insures the next generation will prosper and be valued and give value back to making our country and planet better - healthier - driven by purpose and not just money or status and job titles.  It may be hard to fathom - but inherently I think we all know - deep down - success is a state of mind one achieves through living a life with purpose, not the balance in your bank account.    


Many recent best selling books like “Lean In” glorify working full time and full throttle as being successful and feed into the paradigm that Woman can and should do it all - that is keep working full-time while also raising children.  


Not many people have the luxury or choice to reduce their paychecks and working hours to care for their children, however, we hope that Employers will see the value in giving men and woman this option. 


Many websites and articles are devoted to helping those who want to make a case for a career and family balance. The following excerpts offer excellent advice for anyone wanting to make a case for part time or a flexible work schedule. 


A 2017 article published in on flexjobs.com provides: 


“If you’re like the majority of workers, the office is not the place where you do your most productive work. According to FlexJobs’ sixth annual survey of more than 5,500 respondents, 66% of professionals think they would be more productive working remotely than in a traditional office. And there’s much more to learn from the survey results!


To help the many people seeking remote work options, FlexJobs has identified the 25 companies that have posted the most remote job openings recently. Scroll down for the complete results of our Super Survey and the list of companies, with examples of currently available remote jobs.


FlexJobs also published a breakdown of data from working parents (those with children 18 or younger at home) who took the 6th Annual Work Flex Super Survey. Check it out here: “Working Parents in 2017: What They Want at Work.”


Full Results from FlexJobs’ 6th Annual Super Survey


Who Wants Flexible Work Options


We often assume that flexible work appeals to a wide variety of professionals for different reasons, but this survey really shows how true that is.


Survey respondents identified themselves as:


Working parents (35%)

Freelancers (26%)

Introverts (23%)

Entrepreneurs (21%)

People living in rural areas (15%)

Stay-at-home moms (14%)

People with chronic physical or mental illness (14%)

Digital nomads (12%)

Caregivers (9%)

Students (9%)

Retirees (8%)

Super commuters (8%)

Environmentalists (6%)

Military spouses (2%)

Stay-at-home dads (2%)

Most survey respondents were baby boomers and gen X, but all generations were represented to varying degrees:


Gen Z (1%)

Millennial or gen Y (21%)

Gen X (41%)

Baby boomer (31%)

Silent generation (6%)

Why Professionals Seek Flexible Work Options


Each year, we ask people to choose the factors that make them want a job with a flexible work option. Since 2013, work-life balance (78%), family (49%), time savings (46%), and commute stress (45%) have been the top four reported reasons people seek flexible work.


In fact, time savings and commute stress may be related: 71% said they have had round-trip commutes of over an hour. Other highly ranked factors include avoiding office politics and distractions (39%) and travel (30%).


People interested in work flexibility evaluate job prospects with that in mind. Respondents said the “most important factors” considered when they evaluate a job prospect are:


Work-life balance (72%)

Flexible schedule and salary (tie) (69%)

Telecommuting (60%)

Meaningful work (57%)

Work schedule (48%)

Location (45%)

Company reputation (40%)

Health insurance (37%)

Professional challenge (36%)

Company culture (34%)

Career progression (30%)

401(k)/retirement benefits and vacation time (tie) (29%)

Skills training and education options (28%)

Amount of travel required (25%)

How a Lack of Flexibility Affects People’s Job Choices, Health


Of survey respondents, 62% have left or considered leaving a job because it did not have work flexibility:


Yes, I have left a job. (32%)

Yes, I am currently looking for a new job. (16%)

Yes, I have considered leaving a job. (14%)

And this makes sense when looking at how respondents said having a flexible job would affect their health and quality of life.


Quality of life: 45% said a job with flexibility would have a huge improvement on their overall quality of life and 52% said it would have a positive impact.

Health: 78% of people said having a flexible job would allow them to be healthier (eat better, exercise more, etc.) and 86% said they’d be less stressed.

Most Desired Types of Flexible Work


Telecommuting remains the most popular form of flexible work, and those who’ve already worked remotely are increasing the amount of time they spend working from home. Of those who telecommuted in 2016, 23% telecommuted more this year than last year.


When asked to choose which types of flexibility they’re most interested, survey respondents said:


Telecommuting 100% of the time (81%)

Flexible schedule (70%)

Telecommuting some of the time (46%)

Part-time schedule (46%)

Alternative schedule (44%)

Freelance contract (39%)

How Remote Work Helps Productivity


Asked whether they would be more productive working remotely or in a traditional office space, respondents said:


More productive in a home office (66%)

Probably about the same productivity (32%)

Less productive in a home office (2%)

That’s understandable when you consider their answers to this question:


“Where do you go when you really need to get something done for work?”


My home or my home office (52%)

The office during regular office hours, because it’s not an option to leave (25%)

The office during regular office hours, because it’s where I’m most productive (7%)

The office before/after regular office hours (8%)

A library, coffee shop, or coworking space (6%)

The top reasons respondents said they would be, or are, more productive working remotely are:


Fewer interruptions from colleagues (76%)

Fewer distractions (76%)

Reduced stress from commuting (70%)

Minimal office politics (69%)

Quieter noise level (62%)

More comfortable clothes (54%)

More personalized office environment (51%)

Less frequent meetings (46%)

More efficient meetings (31%)

Why People Work


We wanted to learn about why people work—their needs and motivations.


We found that the majority of people have mixed reasons for working:


I both need and want to work. (64%)

I need to work. (25%)

I want to work. (11%)

The specific reasons respondents said they work:


Pay for basic necessities (rent or mortgage, groceries, utilities, etc.) (76%)

Save for retirement (61%)

Want to travel (56%)

Pay off debt (54%)

Enjoy working (54%)

Pay for “luxury” items for yourself or your loved ones (meaning not basic necessities) (43%)

Passionate about success in my career (39%)

Want to have a professional impact in the world (38%)

Pay for health-related issues for myself or a loved one (37%)

Contribute to charity (27%)

Pay for other child-related costs (child care, extracurriculars, etc.) (25%)

Save for my kids’ education (25%)

Pay for my kids’ education (private school or college) (24%)

Pay for continuing education for myself (23%)

Support my parents (15%)

What This Means for Employers


Flexible work options are often seen as a perk for the workers only, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. Employers benefit greatly from offering flexible work options in these ways according to survey respondents:


Employee retention: 79% of respondents said they would be more loyal to their employers if they had flexible work options.

Working relationships: 73% think remote work is conducive to having strong work relationships.

Reducing expenses: 29% of respondents said they would take a 10% or 20% cut in pay. 22% are willing to forfeit vacation time. 19% said they would give up employer-matching retirement contributions.

Education and experience: Work flexibility appeals to highly educated and experienced workers. 79% of respondents have at least a college degree and 31% are senior manager level or higher.

Hiring strategy: 97% of respondents are interested in being a flexible worker in the long-term. Offering flexible work options can help attract well-educated professionals with solid experience who come from diverse backgrounds.

Demographic Breakdown of the 5,551 Respondents


Age: 20-29 (11%), 30-49 (50%), 50-59 (26%), 60+ (13%)

Education: high school degree or equivalent (5%), some college but no degree (16%), associate or bachelor’s degree (49%), graduate degree (30%)

Career level: entry-level (11%), experienced (58%), manager or senior level manager (31%)

The Top 25 Companies Recently Hiring for Remote Jobs


To help job seekers interested in finding jobs where they can work from home, FlexJobs has identified the top 25 companies recently hiring for remote jobs. This list is based on an analysis of over 40,000 companies and looks specifically at their remote job posting histories in FlexJobs’ database between May 1 and July 31, 2017.


The jobs offered by these companies had to be remote work-friendly, either allowing for candidates to work remotely entirely or part of the time. Current remote job openings that pay six figures at several these companies include medical director, senior cloud architect, and clinical advisor pharmacist. Other high-paying job listings include senior data programmer, director – service and support, and speech language pathologist.

Kaplan

UnitedHealth Group

K12

VocoVision

Connections Education

Leidos

CyraCom

Vivint Smart Home

Thermo Fisher Scientific

SYKES

CSRA

Allergan

PRA Health Sciences

Anthem, Inc.

Conduent

Cornerstone OnDemand

Salesforce

Humana

Dell

Xerox

Appen

Haynes & Company

SAP

Wells Fargo

Teradata


https://www.flexjobs.com/blog/post/productive-working-remotely-top-companies-hiring/


A Forbes article in 2016 also offers some good advice for those who are at the proverbial cross roads of raising children and having a career.  It provides: 


“Traditional working hours are changing. Not only is it becoming more common for employers to offer flexible work schedules, but many are discovering the benefits, both financially and in terms of productivity, of having a part-time or flexible workforce.


Though it doesn't work for every company or boss, if you find yourself in a position where it's that or quit, it's worth bringing up — especially if you can show you're capable of taking care of your responsibilities in less time. Below, seven coaches from Forbes Coaches Council tell you how to strategize before broaching the subject with your employer. 


1. Offer a Solution to a Problem


Employers love problem solvers. Schedule some time to meet with your employer to figure out what their biggest challenge is and come up with a game plan to solve it. Map out everything that you've accomplished during your tenure as a part-time employee and list out what you bring to the table specifically. Have a follow-up conversation explaining your value and how you can be an asset to the company. — Ariel Lopez, 2020Shift



2. Show You Are the Right Person for the Job


You can demonstrate your value to a prospective employer through your willingness to get the job done and showing that you are the right person for the job. While the position may be full time, perhaps your enthusiasm, focused time management, and stellar interpersonal skills allow you to do full-time work in more efficient time-saving ways. Be the solution the employer needs and you will win. — Wendi Weiner, JD, NCRW, CPRW, CCM, The Writing Guru


3. Show a Full-Time Value Despite Your Part-Time Schedule


As an organizational psychologist and as a coach for job searchers, what I advise job seekers who are under this circumstance is to do everything at 100 percent, as if they want to work full time. In other words, show your skills as if you could offer the company a full-time value despite your part-time schedule. Showing how the company would save money for a reduced labor cost would also work. — Dr. Cherry Collier, Personality Matters, INC.


4. Reframe the Opportunity as a Win-Win for Both of You


Instead of leading with the "why you can't," bring the "why you can" to the table. Showcasing a plan that allows you to work smarter versus harder is a win for the employer. Especially if you can fill a need that keeps productivity up and saves them on other costs related to labor. Show your ingenuity and innovation to reframe the opportunity as a win-win for both of you. — Jen Kelchner, Kelchner Advisory


5. Prove You're Invaluable and Efficient


Few positions these days actually require full-time hours, especially when someone is focused and efficient in their work. If you're looking at a position that's full time but can only give part time hours show the hiring manager that you're more efficient than anyone else they can hire. They'll get results faster, making you an invaluable part of the team. — Kelly Azevedo, She's Got Systems


6. Focus on Results


What does the employer want? If it's a results-based position, demonstrate how you can deliver the outcome the employer is looking for while reducing their labor costs. They get the production they're seeking from the position with less of an investment. — Pat Rigsby, PatRigsby.com


7. Present a Solid Plan


Identify your average weekly availability to work (including "normal" work hours and availability during weeknights/weekends). With some flexibility on hours and good time management, you can work closer to full-time hours while still maximizing time for the rest of your life (family, school, etc.). Be prepared with a plan to show how your background and flexibility is a recipe for success. — Emily Kapit, MS, MRW, ACRW, CPRW, ReFresh Your Step, LLC”


See https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbescoachescouncil/2016/03/18/how-to-convince-your-employer-to-let-you-work-part-time/#20cc944f2e88


Another Forbes article states: why many employer’s may not grant your request: TRUST.


https://www.forbes.com/sites/lizryan/2017/03/15/the-real-reason-youre-not-allowed-to-work-from-home/#2e92f6217084



US News and World Report also gave some good advice in 2012 as outlined below:


“1. First, assess your reason. We'd all love to work less and make more, but consider what your real reasons are for wanting to work part-time. Do you want to spend more time with your family? Are you finding your current workload overwhelming? Maybe you're going back to school and need extra time for class and homework. Or are you starting a business you want to focus on? Understanding your motivation for moving into part-time work can help you better convince your boss that he should consider it. And knowing whether going part-time would be temporary or permanent will also help him decide.


2. Next, know your data. While your boss might use the information you show him to make his decision, it will help you make your point that part-time jobs are on the rise. Approximately 25 percent of all working women in the United States work part-time, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Find data that backs up your points, and if possible, find someone who successfully works part-time in your company to interview.


Studies also show that workers who are in the office half of the time can be as productive, if not more so, than their full-time counterparts, possibly because they have less time to get more done, and don't waste time at the water cooler.


3. Outline what part-time would look like. Part-time jobs can be 20 hours a week, or 30. They can be half day, five days a week, or two days in the office at full throttle. They can be worked in the office or at home. Devise a plan for your ideal situation, and then another that you'd be satisfied with, should your boss not bite on the ideal plan.


Consider the work you won't be able to get done. You could propose hiring another part-timer for the other half of your workload, or advocate to distribute the work amongst your co-workers (an idea they won't be excited about).


4. Prepare your pitch. Your boss will want reassurance that you'll be as productive and accessible as you've been in the past. Have answers ready about your availability: You'll be available via chat or phone during specific hours, and you'll respond to emails within 24 hours. Find the balance that will make him feel like he's winning in cutting your salary but still getting the benefit of being able to access you, while you get the benefit of working less.


Schedule a time to discuss your part-time proposal; don't accost your boss in the hallway in between meetings. You need his or her undivided attention, and you need to be able to pitch your idea professionally. Keep your emotions and personal woes out of it. Focus on how working part-time will help both you and the company.


If your company is hesitant about signing off on the idea, propose a trial period of three months. If they agree to this, do your best to show them how well the scenario can work.”


https://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/outside-voices-careers/2012/11/12/how-to-switch-to-part-time-work Writen by: Lindsay Olson.


It the pros and cons don’t convince an Employer, it may be necessary to appeal to their bottom line.  Legislation at the local, state and federal levels may also help persuade Employers to offer options.  Government sweeteners and tax credits for those who offer flexible work schedules and part-time options may help provide the proverbial carrot to get Employers to offer options to mothers and fathers who want to help care for their children and family.   


To achieve effective legislative remedies, we must examine successful programs implemented by other countries and enlist the help of influencers on both sides of the political aisle such as Ivanka Trump and Senator Gillibrand and other respected political activist groups and leaders who forge a bipartisan win-win solution for the next generation and generations to come. 

Want a Part-Time/Flex Work Schedule?

Tips on How to Get One  


According to 2016 Department of Labor -  Labor Force Statistics from the Current Population Survey (In thousands)  - Woman in the 22-54 years range total 36,959, but only 3,049 work less than 35 hours for economic and non-economic (child rearing) reasons.   This represents roughly 12% of the work force allowed to work part-time.  https://www.bls.gov/cps/cpsaat08.htm


Clearly, not many employers are convinced that part-time and/or flexible work schedules are a valuable asset for both the Employer and Employees.


Our goal is to give you the tools to be a disrupter, and to shift the paradigm to make caring for children and family a priority and value added to not only Employer’s, but to society as a whole.   Simply put, raising health and happy children insures the next generation will prosper and be valued and give value back to making our country and planet better - healthier - driven by purpose and not just money or status and job titles.  It may be hard to fathom - but inherently I think we all know - deep down - success is a state of mind one achieves through living a life with purpose, not the balance in your bank account.    


Many recent best selling books like “Lean In” glorify working full time and full throttle as being successful and feed into the paradigm that Woman can and should do it all - that is keep working full-time while also raising children.  


Not many people have the luxury or choice to reduce their paychecks and working hours to care for their children, however, we hope that Employers will see the value in giving men and woman this option. 


Many websites and articles are devoted to helping those who want to make a case for a career and family balance. The following excerpts offer excellent advice for anyone wanting to make a case for part time or a flexible work schedule. 


A 2017 article published in on Flexjobs.com provides: 


“If you’re like the majority of workers, the office is not the place where you do your most productive work. According to FlexJobs’ sixth annual survey of more than 5,500 respondents, 66% of professionals think they would be more productive working remotely than in a traditional office. And there’s much more to learn from the survey results!


To help the many people seeking remote work options, FlexJobs has identified the 25 companies that have posted the most remote job openings recently. Scroll down for the complete results of our Super Survey and the list of companies, with examples of currently available remote jobs.


A survey they conducted asked whether workers would be more productive working remotely or in a traditional office space, respondents said:


More productive in a home office (66%)

Probably about the same productivity (32%)

Less productive in a home office (2%)


That’s understandable when you consider their answers to this question:


“Where do you go when you really need to get something done for work?”


My home or my home office (52%)

The office during regular office hours, because it’s not an option to leave (25%)

The office during regular office hours, because it’s where I’m most productive (7%)

The office before/after regular office hours (8%)

A library, coffee shop, or coworking space (6%)


The top reasons respondents said they would be, or are, more productive working remotely are:


Fewer interruptions from colleagues (76%)

Fewer distractions (76%)

Reduced stress from commuting (70%)

Minimal office politics (69%)

Quieter noise level (62%)

More comfortable clothes (54%)

More personalized office environment (51%)

Less frequent meetings (46%)

More efficient meetings (31%)


What This Means for Employers


Flexible work options are often seen as a perk for the workers only, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. Employers benefit greatly from offering flexible work options in these ways according to survey respondents:


Employee retention: 79% of respondents said they would be more loyal to their employers if they had flexible work options.

Working relationships: 73% think remote work is conducive to having strong work relationships.

Reducing expenses: 29% of respondents said they would take a 10% or 20% cut in pay. 22% are willing to forfeit vacation time. 19% said they would give up employer-matching retirement contributions.

Education and experience: Work flexibility appeals to highly educated and experienced workers. 79% of respondents have at least a college degree and 31% are senior manager level or higher.

Hiring strategy: 97% of respondents are interested in being a flexible worker in the long-term. Offering flexible work options can help attract well-educated professionals with solid experience who come from diverse backgrounds.


Demographic Breakdown of the 5,551 Respondents

Age: 20-29 (11%), 30-49 (50%), 50-59 (26%), 60+ (13%)

Education: high school degree or equivalent (5%), some college but no degree (16%), associate or bachelor’s degree (49%), graduate degree (30%)

Career level: entry-level (11%), experienced (58%), manager or senior level manager (31%)

The Top 25 Companies Recently Hiring for Remote Jobs


To help job seekers interested in finding jobs where they can work from home, FlexJobs has identified the top 25 companies recently hiring for remote jobs. This list is based on an analysis of over 40,000 companies and looks specifically at their remote job posting histories in FlexJobs’ database between May 1 and July 31, 2017.


The jobs offered by these companies had to be remote work-friendly, either allowing for candidates to work remotely entirely or part of the time. Current remote job openings that pay six figures at several these companies include medical director, senior cloud architect, and clinical advisor pharmacist. Other high-paying job listings include senior data programmer, director – service and support, and speech language pathologist.


Kaplan, UnitedHealth Group, K12, VocoVision, Connections Education

Leidos, CyraCom, Vivint Smart Home, Thermo Fisher Scientific, SYKES, CSRA, Allergan, PRA Health Sciences, Anthem, Inc., Conduent, Cornerstone OnDemand, Salesforce, Humana, Dell, Xerox, Appen, Haynes & Company, SAP, Wells Fargo, Teradata


For full article and survey visit: 

https://www.flexjobs.com/blog/post/productive-working-remotely-top-companies-hiring/


A Forbes article in 2016 also offers some good advice for those who are at the proverbial cross roads of raising children and having a career.  It provides: 


“Traditional working hours are changing. Not only is it becoming more common for employers to offer flexible work schedules, but many are discovering the benefits, both financially and in terms of productivity, of having a part-time or flexible workforce.


Though it doesn't work for every company or boss, if you find yourself in a position where it's that or quit, it's worth bringing up — especially if you can show you're capable of taking care of your responsibilities in less time. Below, seven coaches from Forbes Coaches Council tell you how to strategize before broaching the subject with your employer. 


1. Offer a Solution to a Problem


Employers love problem solvers. Schedule some time to meet with your employer to figure out what their biggest challenge is and come up with a game plan to solve it. Map out everything that you've accomplished during your tenure as a part-time employee and list out what you bring to the table specifically. Have a follow-up conversation explaining your value and how you can be an asset to the company. — Ariel Lopez, 2020Shift



2. Show You Are the Right Person for the Job


You can demonstrate your value to a prospective employer through your willingness to get the job done and showing that you are the right person for the job. While the position may be full time, perhaps your enthusiasm, focused time management, and stellar interpersonal skills allow you to do full-time work in more efficient time-saving ways. Be the solution the employer needs and you will win. — Wendi Weiner, JD, NCRW, CPRW, CCM, The Writing Guru


3. Show a Full-Time Value Despite Your Part-Time Schedule


As an organizational psychologist and as a coach for job searchers, what I advise job seekers who are under this circumstance is to do everything at 100 percent, as if they want to work full time. In other words, show your skills as if you could offer the company a full-time value despite your part-time schedule. Showing how the company would save money for a reduced labor cost would also work. — Dr. Cherry Collier, Personality Matters, INC.


4. Reframe the Opportunity as a Win-Win for Both of You


Instead of leading with the "why you can't," bring the "why you can" to the table. Showcasing a plan that allows you to work smarter versus harder is a win for the employer. Especially if you can fill a need that keeps productivity up and saves them on other costs related to labor. Show your ingenuity and innovation to reframe the opportunity as a win-win for both of you. — Jen Kelchner, Kelchner Advisory


5. Prove You're Invaluable and Efficient


Few positions these days actually require full-time hours, especially when someone is focused and efficient in their work. If you're looking at a position that's full time but can only give part time hours show the hiring manager that you're more efficient than anyone else they can hire. They'll get results faster, making you an invaluable part of the team. — Kelly Azevedo, She's Got Systems


6. Focus on Results


What does the employer want? If it's a results-based position, demonstrate how you can deliver the outcome the employer is looking for while reducing their labor costs. They get the production they're seeking from the position with less of an investment. — Pat Rigsby, PatRigsby.com


7. Present a Solid Plan


Identify your average weekly availability to work (including "normal" work hours and availability during weeknights/weekends). With some flexibility on hours and good time management, you can work closer to full-time hours while still maximizing time for the rest of your life (family, school, etc.). Be prepared with a plan to show how your background and flexibility is a recipe for success. — Emily Kapit, MS, MRW, ACRW, CPRW, ReFresh Your Step, LLC”


See https://www.forbes.com/sites/forbescoachescouncil/2016/03/18/how-to-convince-your-employer-to-let-you-work-part-time/#20cc944f2e88


Another Forbes article states: why many employer’s may not grant your request: TRUST.


https://www.forbes.com/sites/lizryan/2017/03/15/the-real-reason-youre-not-allowed-to-work-from-home/#2e92f6217084



US News and World Report also gave some good advice in 2012 as outlined below:


“1. First, assess your reason. We'd all love to work less and make more, but consider what your real reasons are for wanting to work part-time. Do you want to spend more time with your family? Are you finding your current workload overwhelming? Maybe you're going back to school and need extra time for class and homework. Or are you starting a business you want to focus on? Understanding your motivation for moving into part-time work can help you better convince your boss that he should consider it. And knowing whether going part-time would be temporary or permanent will also help him decide.


2. Next, know your data. While your boss might use the information you show him to make his decision, it will help you make your point that part-time jobs are on the rise. Approximately 25 percent of all working women in the United States work part-time, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Find data that backs up your points, and if possible, find someone who successfully works part-time in your company to interview.


Studies also show that workers who are in the office half of the time can be as productive, if not more so, than their full-time counterparts, possibly because they have less time to get more done, and don't waste time at the water cooler.


3. Outline what part-time would look like. Part-time jobs can be 20 hours a week, or 30. They can be half day, five days a week, or two days in the office at full throttle. They can be worked in the office or at home. Devise a plan for your ideal situation, and then another that you'd be satisfied with, should your boss not bite on the ideal plan.


Consider the work you won't be able to get done. You could propose hiring another part-timer for the other half of your workload, or advocate to distribute the work amongst your co-workers (an idea they won't be excited about).


4. Prepare your pitch. Your boss will want reassurance that you'll be as productive and accessible as you've been in the past. Have answers ready about your availability: You'll be available via chat or phone during specific hours, and you'll respond to emails within 24 hours. Find the balance that will make him feel like he's winning in cutting your salary but still getting the benefit of being able to access you, while you get the benefit of working less.


Schedule a time to discuss your part-time proposal; don't accost your boss in the hallway in between meetings. You need his or her undivided attention, and you need to be able to pitch your idea professionally. Keep your emotions and personal woes out of it. Focus on how working part-time will help both you and the company.


If your company is hesitant about signing off on the idea, propose a trial period of three months. If they agree to this, do your best to show them how well the scenario can work.”


https://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/outside-voices-careers/2012/11/12/how-to-switch-to-part-time-work Writen by: Lindsay Olson.


It the pros and cons don’t convince an Employer, it may be necessary to appeal to their bottom line.  Legislation at the local, state and federal levels may also help persuade Employers to offer options.  Government sweeteners and tax credits for those who offer flexible work schedules and part-time options may help provide the proverbial carrot to get Employers to offer options to mothers and fathers who want to help care for their children and family.   


To achieve effective legislative remedies, we must examine successful programs implemented by other countries and enlist the help of influencers on both sides of the political aisle such as Ivanka Trump and Senator Gillibrand and other respected political activist groups and leaders who forge a bipartisan win-win solution for the next generation and generations to come.